"registry editor disabled by administrator" solution

your win XP 2 infected with virus. Maybe rontokbro@mm. to restore back the regedit.

download this file save to your desktop then Right-click the UnHookExec.inf file and click install. (This is a small file. It does not display any notice or boxes when you run it).Hope it's work for you.

You cannot install some programs after you restore Windows Vista by using a "Windows Complete PC Backup and Restore Image"

SYMPTOMS

After you restore a Windows Vista-based computer by using a "Windows Complete PC Backup and Restore Image," you may be unable to install certain programs. When this problem occurs, you may receive the following error message:
The Directory Name is Invalid.


CAUSE

This problem occurs because the Temp folder (%temp%) is not restored after you restore the backup. Typically, the Temp folder is found in the following location:
C:\Windows\Temp



RESOLUTION

To resolve this problem after the problem has occurred

To resolve this problem after the problem has occurred, you must re-create the Temp folder. Also, you must make sure that the Temp folder has the correct permissions. To do this, follow these steps:
1.Click Start Start button , click All Programs, and then click Accessories.
2.Right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as Administrator.

 User Account Control permission If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type your password or click Continue.
3.Type the following command at the command prompt, and then press ENTER:
md %windir%\temp
Note Leave the Command Prompt window open, because you must use it again.
4.Click Start Start button , type %windir% in the Start Search box, and then click Windows in the Programs list.
5.Right-click the Temp folder, and then click Properties.
6.Click the Security tab, click Advanced, and then click Edit.

 User Account Control permission If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type your password or click Continue.
7.Click to clear the Include inheritable permissions from this object's parent check box.
8.Click Remove, and then click OK.
9.You will receive two warning messages. Click Yes in each warning message.
10.Click OK two times to close the Advanced Security Settings dialog box and the folder properties dialog box.
11.Open the Command Prompt window again.
12. Type the following command at the command prompt, and then press ENTER:
icacls %windir%\temp /grant "BUILTIN\Users:(CI)(S,WD,AD,X)" "BUILTIN\Administrators:(F)" "BUILTIN\Administrators:(OI)(CI)(IO)(F)" "NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM:(F)" "NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM:(OI)(CI)(IO)(F)" "CREATOR OWNER:(OI)(CI)(IO)(F)"
Note you must type the command on a single line exactly as it appears here, and you must include all quotation marks.



APPLIES TO
Windows Vista Ultimate
Windows Vista Enterprise
Windows Vista Business
Windows Vista Ultimate 64-bit Edition
Windows Vista Enterprise 64-bit Edition


You cannot start Windows XP after you install Windows Vista in a dual-boot configuration together with Windows XP

SYMPTOMS

After you install Windows Vista in a dual-boot configuration together with Microsoft Windows XP, you receive an error message that resembles the following when you try to start the computer by using Windows XP:
Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt:

C:\Windows\system32\ntoskrnl.exe. Please re-install a copy of the above file.


CAUSE

You experience this problem if Windows Vista is installed in formerly unallocated disk space that existed in front of the partition on which Windows XP is installed.

In this situation, the Windows Vista Setup program creates a new partition in the unallocated disk space. Because a new partition is created in front of the partition on which Windows XP is installed, the Boot.ini entry for the Windows XP installation points to an invalid partition.

Consider the following scenario:
You have a hard disk, or disk 0, that has some unallocated hard disk space in front of the Windows XP partition.
The Windows XP Boot.ini file points to disk(0)partition(1) for the Windows XP startup files.
The Windows Vista program creates a partition in the unallocated hard disk space.
In this scenario, the Windows XP startup files are now located on disk(0)partition(2). However, the Boot.ini file still points to disk(0)partition(1) for these files. Therefore, Windows XP does not start successfully.


RESOLUTION

To resolve this problem, modify the Windows XP Boot.ini file to point to the correct partition. To do this, follow these steps:
1.Start Windows Vista.
2.Right-click StartStart button, and then click Explore.
3.On the Organize menu, click Folder and Search Options.
4.In the Folder Options dialog box, click the View tab.
5.In the Advanced settings area, click Show hidden files and folders, click to clear the Hide extensions for known file types check box, click to clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box, click Yes to confirm that you want to display operating system files, and then click OK.
6.Locate and then click the Windows XP system drive. In the Windows Vista Windows Explorer program, this will likely be drive D.
7.In the right pane, right-click boot.ini, and then click Properties.
8.In the boot.ini Properties dialog box, click the Security tab, and then click Advanced.
9.Click the Owner tab, and then click Edit.

 User Account Control permission If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type your password or click Continue.
10.In the Change owner to list, click your alias or leave the default Administrators option selected, and then click OK four times.
11.Right-click boot.ini, and then click Edit.
12.Modify the Advanced RISC Computing (ARC) path as appropriate for the correct path of the Windows XP startup partition. For example, if the Windows Vista Setup program created a partition in the unallocated disk space in front of the partition on which Windows XP is installed, you must increment the partition value by one. Therefore, if the Boot.ini file contains partition(1) along the ARC path of the Windows XP operating system, modify the ARC path to use partition(2). In this situation, the ARC path resembles the following:
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect
13.Save the changes to the Boot.ini file, and then exit Notepad.


APPLIES TO
Windows Vista Ultimate
Windows Vista Enterprise
Windows Vista Business
Windows Vista Home Premium
Windows Vista Home Basic
Windows Vista Starter
Windows Vista Enterprise 64-bit edition
Windows Vista Home Basic 64-bit edition
Windows Vista Home Premium 64-bit edition
Windows Vista Ultimate 64-bit edition



The hybrid sleep feature and the hibernation feature in Windows Vista may become unavailable after you use the Disk Cleanup Tool

SYMPTOMS

After you use the Disk Cleanup Tool in Windows Vista, you may experience the following symptoms:
You cannot see the Hibernate option in Power Options.
When you use the sleep feature, the computer does not recover its settings if power is lost.

CAUSE

This problem occurs when the Disk Cleanup Tool disables the hibernation file. The hibernation file must be enabled to access the hybrid sleep feature and the hibernation feature in Windows Vista.

When the hibernation file is disabled, and the hybrid sleep feature is enabled, a backup of open programs and open files will not be saved to the disk when you use the sleep feature in Windows Vista. Additionally, if the computer loses power while the Windows is in sleep mode, open programs and open files will not be recovered, and any unsaved work will be lost.


RESOLUTION

To resolve this problem in Windows Vista, run the powercfg -h on command at a command prompt to enable the hibernate feature and the hybrid sleep feature. To run this command, follow these steps:
1.Click Start Start button , click All Programs, and then click Accessories.
2.Right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator. User Account Control permission If you are prompted for an administrator password or for confirmation, type the password, or click Continue.
3.Type powercfg -h on, and then press ENTER.


APPLIES TO
Windows Vista Enterprise 64-bit Edition
Windows Vista Home Basic 64-bit Edition
Windows Vista Home Premium 64-bit Edition
Windows Vista Ultimate 64-bit Edition
Windows Vista Business
Windows Vista Business 64-bit Edition
Windows Vista Enterprise
Windows Vista Home Basic
Windows Vista Home Basic Beta
Windows Vista Home Premium
Windows Vista Starter
Windows Vista Ultimate

Cumulative time zone update for Microsoft Windows operating systems

Important This update supersedes and replaces update KB931836, released in January 2007. This update also includes additional time zone changes that were signed in to law after update KB931836 was created. Customers who have already deployed update KB931836 should evaluate whether any of the five specific time zone changes that are addressed in the update described by this Microsoft Knowledge Base (KB) article merit deploying this update immediately. If systems are not directly affected, you can schedule deployment at the next available opportunity. We recommend that all customers standardize on the most current Windows cumulative time zone update to guarantee the consistency of the time zone database on all systems.


INTRODUCTION

The update that this article describes changes the time zone data to account for daylight saving time (DST) changes in several countries, as outlined. This update also includes other DST-related changes, time zone-related changes, and settings-related changes. Some of these changes will occur in 2007. Some of these changes have occurred since the products that are listed in the "Applies to" section were originally released.




Update is available that improves the compatibility and reliability of Windows Vista

INTRODUCTION
This update resolves some compatibility issues and reliability issues in Windows Vista. By applying this update, you can achieve better reliability and hardware compatibility in various scenarios.



The computer stops responding, and you receive a "Display driver stopped responding and has recovered" error message. You can restart the computer only by pressing the computer's power button.
The computer stops responding or restarts unexpectedly when you play video games or perform desktop operations.
The Diagnostic Policy Service (DPS) stops responding when the computer is under heavy load or when very little memory is available. This problem prevents diagnostics from working.
The screen goes blank after an external display device that is connected to the computer is turned off. For example, this problem may occur when a projector is turned off during a presentation.
There are stability issues with some graphics processing units (GPUs). These issues could cause GPUs to stop responding (hang).
Visual appearance issues occur when you play graphics-intensive games.
You experience poor playback quality when you play HD DVD disks or Blu-ray disks on a large monitor.
Applications that load the Netcfgx.dll component exit unexpectedly.
Windows Calendar exits unexpectedly after you create a new appointment, create a new task, and then restart the computer.
Internet Connection Sharing stops responding after you upgrade a computer that is running Microsoft Windows XP to Windows Vista and then restart the computer.
The Printer Spooler service stops unexpectedly.

Maximum Partition Size Using FAT16 File System

SUMMARY
Microsoft MS-DOS versions 4.0 and later allow FDISK to partition hard disks up to 4 gigabytes (GB) in size. However, the MS-DOS file allocation table (FAT) file system can support only 2 GB per partition. Because of this fact, a hard disk between 2 and 4 GB in size must be broken down into multiple partitions, each of which does not exceed 2 GB. NOTE: Windows 95 OEM Service Release version 2 and later support drives larger than 2 GB using the FAT32 file system. For more information about the FAT32 file system



MORE INFORMATION

The 2-GB partition limit is imposed by the maximum number of clusters and the largest cluster size supported by the FAT file system. The FAT file system is limited to 65,525 clusters. The size of a cluster must be a power of 2 and less than 65,536 bytes--this results in a maximum cluster size of 32,768 bytes (32K). Multiplying the maximum number of clusters (65,525) by the maximum cluster size (32,768) equals 2 GB. Note that the hard disk drive must be supported by the computer's ROM BIOS APIs, which have a 1024-cylinder limitation, in order for FDISK to partition the hard disk. Because 32K per cluster can waste valuable hard disk space, the FAT file system is not always the best hard disk management scheme. Microsoft Windows NT uses the NT File System (NTFS), which uses a different file/cluster scheme. Microsoft OS/2 version 1.3 offered HPFS, which also uses a more conservative method of allocating disk resources. NOTE: Microsoft Windows NT also supports FAT drives. Windows NT 3.51 supports FAT drives up to 4 GB in size. FAT drives from 2 GB to 4 GB in size are not supported by MS-DOS or Windows. In other words, if you wish to have a FAT drive accessible from MS-DOS or Windows 95/98 and Windows NT, your FAT drive should be no larger than 2 GB. If you will be accessing the FAT drive from only Windows NT, then the drive can be 2 GB to 4 GB in size.



APPLIES TO
•Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition
•Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition
•Microsoft Windows 98 Standard Edition
•Microsoft Windows 95
•Microsoft MS-DOS 6.22 Standard Edition

Triple Boot to Windows NT, Windows 95/98, and MS-DOS


SUMMARY
This article describes how to set up a computer so that the user can go directly to Windows NT, Windows 95/98, or MS-DOS by making a selection from the Boot.ini, without any need for Windows 95/98 multiple boot support.

MORE INFORMATION

Windows 98 or Windows 95 should not be installed in the same partition as Windows NT; the shared Program Files folder can cause problems with interactions between Microsoft Internet Explorer and Microsoft Outlook Express on these operating systems. Also, if you are using both FAT32 and NTFS volumes, the NTFS partition should be on a logical drive letter that preceeds the FAT32 partition drive letter. If this is set up the other way around, Windows NT will not find the boot partition (where the system files are located). This information applies to x86 processors only. Follow these steps to enable triple boot support:

1.Install MS-DOS.
2.Install Windows NT.
3. Remove the read-only, hidden, and system attributes of Bootsect.dos by typing and running the following line from the command prompt: attrib -r -h -s bootsect.dos.
4.Copy the boot sector for MS-DOS by typing and running the following line from the command prompt: copy c:\bootsect.dos c:\bootsect.sav.
5. Boot to MS-DOS and install Windows 95/98.
6.Repair the Windows NT boot sector as Windows 95/98 has over-written the boot sector. This will also create a new Bootsect.dos for Windows 95/98. For additional information,
7.Remove the read-only, hidden, and system attributes from the Windows 95/98 Bootsect.dos by typing and running the following line from the command prompt: attrib -r -h -s bootsect.dos.
8. Rename the Windows 95/98 boot sector from C:\Bootsect.dos to C:\Bootsect.w40.
9. Rename the MS-DOS boot sector from C:\Bootsect.sav to C:\Bootsect.dos.
10. Remove the read-only attribute from boot.ini by typing and running the following line from the command prompt: attrib -r boot.ini.

11. Modify Boot.ini using any text editor, such as Edit or Notepad, by adding the following lines:
[Operating Systems]c:\bootsect.dos="MS-DOS v6.22" /win95dosc:\bootsect.w40="Windows 95/98" /win95 You should now see the additional choices of "Windows 95/98" and "MS-DOS v6.22" when you start Windows NT. The new switches, /win95dos and /win95, are needed so that Windows NT can emulate the multiple boot process of Windows 95/98. This article contains information about using Windows NT with a configuration that has not been tested and is not supported by Microsoft. If the steps described in this article do not function properly, use a supported configuration. If Windows NT is going to be on the same partitions as MS-DOS and/or Windows 95/98, the partition must be an MS-DOS partition. Windows 95/98 FAT 32 partitions will not work with MS-DOS and Windows NT. Using NTFS or FAT32 partitions will require different partitions for each operation system. The ARC path in the Boot.ini file will need to be modified to reflect the different partitions. For additional information,

APPLIES TO
•Microsoft Windows NT Server 3.5
•Microsoft Windows NT Server 3.51
•Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 Standard Edition
•Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 3.5
•Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 3.51
•Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Developer Edition
•Microsoft Windows 98 Standard Edition
•Microsoft Windows 95

Multiple boot Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Me, and MS-DOS


SUMMARY
This article describes how to configure an Intel-based computer to multiple boot the following Microsoft operating system:

•MS-DOS
•Microsoft Windows 95, Microsoft Windows 98, or Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me)
•Microsoft Windows NT
•Microsoft Windows 2000
•Microsoft Windows XP


MORE INFORMATION
If you want to multiple boot operating systems, install the operating systems in the following order:
1.MS-DOS
2.Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me
3.Windows NT
4.Windows 2000
5.Windows XPInstall each operating system according to the standard installation procedure.
You can start the following operating systems from the boot loader (Osloader) screen:

•Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me
•Windows NT
•Windows 2000

•Windows XPNOTE: You should install each operating system on a separate logical drive. If you install multiple operating systems on single drive, you may experience problems when you attempt to run those operating systems. If you install multiple operating systems on a single drive, Microsoft Internet Explorer may quit and you may receive an error message that is similar to the following error message:

iexplore caused an Invalid Page Fault in module kernel32.dll You can configure your computer to start Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT, and either Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me. However, you cannot configure a computer to multiple boot any combination of Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows Me because Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows Me use the same boot file. Therefore, multiple booting Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows Me at the same time is not supported. You should install Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me before you install Windows NT, Windows 2000, and Windows XP to prevent the Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me Setup program from replacing the Windows XP, Windows 2000, or Windows NT boot sector with its own boot sector. Because a Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me boot sector identifies the partition as a FAT16 or FAT32 partition, Windows NT, Windows 2000, and Windows XP can no longer access NTFS volumes. To install Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me first, use the installation procedures that are provided with Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me. If you want to multiple boot Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT, and Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me with MS-DOS, install MS-DOS first.


How to Start MS-DOS from the Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me Startup Menu
To start MS-DOS from the Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me Startup menu:
1.Choose either Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Millennium Edition from the menu on the boot loader screen, and then press ENTER.
2. To display the Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me Startup menu, press F8.
3.To start MS-DOS, choose the Previous version of MS-DOS option.

How to Start MS-DOS Directly
To start MS-DOS directly:
1.Choose Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Millennium Edition from the menu on the boot loader screen, and then press ENTER.
2.To start MS-DOS, press F4.Another way to start the three operating systems is to configure your computer to multiple boot Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT, and Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me, and then start MS-DOS from an MS-DOS bootable floppy disk. If you multiple boot Windows XP, Windows 2000 and MS-DOS, or Windows NT and MS-DOS, you can install Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me by using the procedure in the following section.

How to Install Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me in a Windows XP, Windows 2000, and MS-DOS, or a Windows NT and MS-DOS Multiple-Boot Configuration

To Install Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me in a Windows XP, Windows 2000, and MS-DOS, or a Windows NT and MS-DOS multiple-boot configuration:
1.When you start your computer, choose MS-DOS from the menu on the boot loader screen.
2.Install Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me in a folder separate from the Windows XP, Windows 2000, or Windows NT %SystemRoot% folder.After you successfully install Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me and restart your computer, the Windows XP or Windows 2000 boot loader screen appears, and you can choose between MS-DOS and Windows XP, Windows 2000, or Windows NT. If you choose MS-DOS, Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me starts.

How to Start MS-DOS from Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me

To start MS-DOS from Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me:
1. On the View menu in My Computer or Windows Explorer, click Options or Folder Options.
2. Click Show All Files on the Options tab, and then click OK.
3. In the list of files, double-click the Msdos.sys file.
4. On the File menu, click Properties.
5. In the Attributes section on the General tab, click to clear both the Read-Only and Hidden ch eck boxes, and then click OK.
6. Open the Msdos.sys file by using a text editor (such as Notepad).
7. Add the following line to the [Options] section of the Msdos.sys file:
BootMulti=1
8. Save the file, and then close the file.

How to Upgrade to Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me

If you upgrade to Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me or if you reinstall Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me, Setup deletes certain files in your MS-DOS folder and replaces them with the Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me version of the files in the Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me folder and in the Command folder. The following files are deleted and replaced by Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me Setup:
Ansi.sysAttrib.sysChkdsk.exeChoice.comCountry.sysDblspace.binDblspace.exeDblspace.sys Debug.exeDefrag.exeDeltree.exeDiskcopy.exeDisplay.sysDoskey.comDrvspace.binDrvspace.exeEdit.comEdit.hlpEga.cpiEmm386.exeFc.exeFdisk.exeFind.exeFormat.comHelp.comKeyb.comKeyboard.sysLabel.exeMem.exeMode.comMore.comMove.exeMscdex.exeMsd.exeNetworks.txtNlsfunc.exeOs2.txtRamdrive.sysReadme.txtScandisk.exeScandisk.iniServer.exeShare.exeSmartdrv.exeSort.exeStart.exeSubst.exeSubst.exeSys.comXcopy.exe


APPLIES TO
•Microsoft Windows XP Professional
•Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
•Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
•Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional Edition
•Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 Standard Edition
•Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Developer Edition
•Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition
•Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition
•Microsoft Windows 98 Standard Edition
•Microsoft Windows 95

Change drive letter assignments in Windows XP

SUMMARY
This article describes how to assign, to change, or to remove drive letters on a drive, a partition, or a volume by using the Disk Management snap-in in Microsoft Windows XP.
The Disk Management snap-in is an administrative tool for managing hard disks and the volumes or partitions that they contain. Use the Disk Management snap-in when you want to add, to change, or to remove drive letters on drives, on partitions, or on volumes on your computer's hard disks, CD-ROM drives, and other removable media devices. Your computer can use up to 26 drive letters, from A through Z. Use drive letters C through Z for hard disk drives. Drive letters A and B are reserved for floppy disk drives. However, if your computer does not have a floppy disk drive, you can assign these letters to removable drives. Before you modify drive-letter assignments, note the following items:

• Changing the drive letter of the system volume or the boot volume is not a built-in feature of the Disk Management snap-in.

• Many MS-DOS-based and Microsoft Windows-based programs refer to specific drive letters for environmental or other variables. If you modify the drive letter, these programs may not function correctly.
How to assign a drive letter
To assign a drive letter to a drive, a partition, or a volume, follow these steps:

1. Log on as Administrator or as a member of the Administrators group.
2. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Performance and Maintenance. Note If you do not see Performance and Maintenance, go to step 3. Performance and Maintenance appears in Control Panel only if you use Category view. If you use Classic view, Performance and Maintenance does not appear.
3. Click Administrative Tools, double-click Computer Management, and then click Disk Management in the left pane.
4. Right-click the drive, the partition, the logical drive, or the volume that you want to assign a drive letter to, and then click Change Drive Letter and Paths.
5. Click Add.
6. Click Assign the following drive letter if it is not already selected, and then either accept the default drive letter or click the drive letter that you want to use.
7. Click OK.
The drive letter is assigned to the drive, to the partition, or to the volume that you specified, and then that drive letter appears in the appropriate drive, partition, or volume in the Disk Management tool.
How to change a drive letter
To change an existing drive letter on a drive, on a partition, or on a volume, follow these steps:
1. Log on as Administrator or as a member of the Administrators group.
2. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Performance and Maintenance.
3. Click Administrative Tools, double-click Computer Management, and then click Disk Management in the left pane.
4. Right-click the drive, the partition, the logical drive, or the volume that you want to assign a drive letter to, and then click Change Drive Letter and Paths.
5. Click Change.
6. Click Assign the following drive letter if it is not already selected, click the drive letter that you want to use, and then click OK.
7. Click Yes when you are prompted to confirm the drive letter change.The drive letter of the drive, the partition, or the volume that you specified is changed, and the new drive letter appears in the appropriate drive, partition, or volume in the Disk Management tool.
How to remove a drive letter
To remove an existing drive letter on a drive, on a partition, or on a volume, follow these steps:
1. Log on as Administrator or as a member of the Administrators group.
2. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Performance and Maintenance.
3. Click Administrative Tools, double-click Computer Management, and then click Disk Management in the left pane.
4. Right-click the drive, the partition, the logical drive, or the volume that you want to assign a drive letter to, and then click Change Drive Letter and Paths.
5. Click Remove.
6. Click Yes when you are prompted to confirm the removal.The drive letter is removed from the drive, from the partition, or from the volume that you specified.
Troubleshooting

•When you try to change an existing drive letter, you receive the following error message:
The volume volume_label drive_letter is currently in use.If you continue, the new drive letter will be assigned; but you can still use the old drive letter to access the volume until you restart your computer. The old drive letter will not be available for assignment until you restart. Warning: Changing the drive letter of a volume could cause programs to no longer run. This error message may appear if there are files that are in use on the drive, on the partition, or on the volume. These files may be in use by you or by other people on the network. To resolve this issue, use one of the following methods:

• Click No when you receive the error message. Quit all the programs that are using the files on the volume, and then change the drive letter. To do this, right-click the volume, click Change Drive Letter and Paths, and then click Change.

• Click Yes to continue with the drive letter change.
• When you try to remove an existing drive letter, you receive the following error message:
The volume volume_label drive_letter is currently in use.If you continue, the drive letter will be freed; however, it will still be available for use until you restart your computer. Warning: Changing the drive letter of a volume could cause programs to no longer run. This error message may appear if there are files that are in use on the drive, the partition, or the volume. These files may be in use by you or by other people on the network. To resolve this issue, use one of the following methods:

• Click No when you receive the error message. Quit all the programs that are using the files on the volume, and then remove the drive letter. To do this, right-click the volume, click Change Drive Letter and Paths, and then click Remove.

• Click Yes to remove the drive letter the next time that you start your computer.

Manually Remove Programs from the Add or Remove Programs Tool

SUMMARY
This article explains how to manually remove an item from the Currently installed programs list in the Add or Remove Programs tool if the item is still displayed after you initially try to remove it.
MORE INFORMATION
The Currently installed programs list in the Add or Remove Programs tool lists all of the Windows-compatible programs that have an uninstall program or feature. Occasionally, a program may not be removed completely, and the registry key that is used to display the program in the Currently installed programs list remains. In this situation, you may need to manually remove the program from the Currently installed programs list in Add or Remove Programs. To do this, follow these steps.
WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.

1. Click Start, and then click Run.

2. In the Open box, type regedt32, and then click OK.
3. In Registry Editor, locate the following registry key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall
4. In the left pane, click the Uninstall registry key, and then click Export on the File menu.
5. In the Export Registry File dialog box that appears, click Desktop in the Save in list, type uninstall in the File name box, and then click Save.
6. Each key listed under Uninstall in the left pane of Registry Editor represents a program that is displayed in the Currently installed programs list of the Add or Remove Programs tool. To determine which program that each key represents, click the key, and then view the following values in the details pane on the right:
DisplayName: The value data for the DisplayName key is the name that is listed in Add or Remove Programs.-and-UninstallString: The value data for the UninstallString key is the program that is used to uninstall the program.
7. After you identify the registry key that represents the program that you removed but which is still displayed in the Currently installed programs list of Add or Remove Programs, right-click the key in the left pane of the Registry Editor window, and then click Delete. Click Yes in response to the "Are you sure you want to delete this key and all of its subkeys?" message.
8. On the File menu, click Exit to quit Registry Editor.
9. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs. In the Currently installed programs list, verify that the program whose registry key you deleted is no longer listed.
10. Do one of the following:
• If the program list is not correct in Add or Remove Programs, double-click the Uninstall.reg file that you saved to your desktop in step 5 to restore the original list of programs in the registry. -or-
• If the program list is correct in Add or Remove Programs, right-click the Uninstall.reg file on your desktop, and then click Delete.

Disk Cleanup Tool in Windows XP

SUMMARY
This article describes how to use the Disk Cleanup tool in Windows XP.

MORE INFORMATION
The Disk Cleanup tool helps you free up space on your hard disk by searching your disk for files that you can safely delete. You can choose to delete some or all of the files. Use Disk Cleanup to perform any of the following tasks to free up space on your hard disk:
• Remove temporary Internet files.
• Remove downloaded program files. For example, ActiveX controls and Java applets that are downloaded from the Internet.
• Empty the Recycle Bin.
• Remove Windows temporary files.
• Remove optional Windows components that you are not using.
• Remove installed programs that you no longer use.You can start Disk Cleanup, by doing any of the following:
• Click Start, and then click Run. In the Open box, type cleanmgr, and then click OK. -or-
• Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Disk Cleanup. -or-
• In Windows Explorer or My Computer, right-click the disk in which you want to free up space, click Properties, click the General tab, and then click Disk Cleanup.


Remove Files Stored on Your Hard Disk
To remove files stored on your hard disk that you no longer use, follow these steps:
1.Click Start, and then click My Computer.
2.Right-click the disk in which you want to free up space, and then click Properties.
3.Click the General tab, and then click Disk Cleanup.
4.Click the Disk Cleanup tab (if it is not already selected), click to select the check boxes next to the files that you want to remove, and then click OK.
5.Click Yes to the proceed with this action, and then click OK.


Remove Windows Components
To remove Windows components that you are not using, follow these steps:
1. Click Start, and then click My Computer.
2. Right-click the disk in which you want to free up space, and then click Properties.
3. Click the General tab, and then click Disk Cleanup.
4. Click the More Options tab, and then under Windows components, click Clean up. The Windows Components Wizard starts.
5. In the Components list, click to clear the check box next to the component(s) that you want to remove.
• A shaded check box next to a component indicates that only some of its subcomponents are installed. If you want to remove a subcomponent, click Details, click to clear the check box next to the subcomponent(s) that you want to remove, and then click OK.
6. Click Next.
7. In the Completing the Windows Components Wizard page, click Finish.
8. Click OK, click Yes to proceed with this action, and then click OK.


Remove Installed Programs
To remove programs that you no longer use, follow these steps
:
1. Click Start, and then click My Computer.
2. Right-click the disk in which you want to free up space, and then click Properties.
3. Click the General tab, and then click Disk Cleanup.
4. Click the More Options tab, and then under Installed programs, click Clean up. The Add or Remove Programs dialog box is displayed.
5. In the Currently installed programs list, click the program that you want to remove, and then click Remove (or Change/Remove).
6. If you receive a prompt to confirm the removal of the program, click Yes.
7. Repeat step 5 and 6 to remove other programs that you no longer use, and then click Close.
8. Click OK, click Yes to proceed with this action, and then click OK.

Remove Restore Points
To remove all restore points except the most recent restore point, follow these steps:
1.Click Start, and then click My Computer.
2. Right-click the disk in which you want to free up space, and then click Properties.
3. Click the General tab, and then click Disk Cleanup.
4.Click the More Options tab, and then under System Restore, click Clean up.
5. Click Yes to remove all but the most recent restore point.
6.Click OK, click Yes to proceed with this action, and then click OK.

Set performance options in Windows XP

INTRODUCTION
Windows allocates resources according to its settings and manages devices accordingly. You can use the System tool in Control Panel to change performance options that control how programs use memory, including paging file size, or environment variables that tell your computer where to find some types of information. This article describes how to set the performance options for your computer.
Manual steps to set performance options in Windows XP
How to manually manage processor time

Windows manages system processing. Windows can allocate tasks between processors and manage multiple processes on a single processor. However, you can set Windows to allocate more processor time to the program that you are currently running. The added processor time causes programs to respond more quickly. Or, if you have background programs such as printing or disk backup that you want to run while you work, you can have Windows share processor resources equally between background and foreground programs. Note You must be logged on as an administrator to the local computer or have the correct network credentials to make certain changes in System.

How to manually change the performance of foreground and background programs
1. Click Start, click Run, and then type sysdm.cpl in the Open box.
2. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Settings under Performance.
3. Click the Advanced tab, and then use one of the following methods under Processor scheduling:
• Click Programs to assign more processor resources to the foreground program than the background program.
• Click Background services to assign equal amounts of processor resources to all programs.Notes
• If you click Programs, the foreground program runs more smoothly and responds more quickly. If you want a background task such as a Backup utility to run faster, click Background services.
• The Programs option allocates short, variable time slices (quanta) to running programs, and the Background services option assigns long, fixed quanta.

How to manually manage computer memory
When your computer is running low on RAM, and you must have more RAM immediately, Windows uses hard disk space to simulate RAM. This is known as virtual memory. It is also known as the paging file. This is similar to the UNIX swapfile. By default, the virtual memory paging file (named pagefile.sys) that is created during installation is 1.5 times the RAM on your computer. You can optimize virtual memory use by dividing the space between multiple drives and by removing space from slow or heavily accessed drives. To best optimize your virtual memory space, divide it among as many physical hard drives as possible. When you select drives, follow these guidelines:
• Try to avoid having a paging file on the same drive as the system files.
• Avoid putting a paging file on a fault-tolerant drive such as a mirrored volume or a RAID-5 volume. Paging files do not require fault-tolerance, and some fault-tolerant computers experience slow data writes because they write data to multiple locations.
• Do not put multiple paging files on different partitions on the same physical disk drive.

How to manually change the size of the virtual memory paging file
You must be logged on as an administrator or as a member of the Administrators group to complete this procedure. If your computer is connected to a network, network policy settings may also prevent you from completing this procedure.
1.Click Start, click Run, and then type sysdm.cpl in the Open box.
2. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Settings under Performance.
3. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Change under Virtual memory.
4. Under Drive [Volume Label], click the drive that contains the paging file that you want to change.
5. Under Paging file size for selected drive, click Custom size, type a new paging file size in megabytes (MB) in the Initial size (MB) or Maximum size (MB) box, and then click Set.If you decrease the size of either the initial or maximum paging file settings, you must restart your computer to see the effects of those changes. When you increase the paging file size, you typically do not have to restart your computer. Notes
• To have Windows select the best paging file size, click System managed size. The recommended minimum size is equivalent to 1.5 times the RAM on your computer, and 3 times that figure for the maximum size. For example, if you have 256 MB of RAM, the minimum size is 384 MB, and the maximum size is 1152 MB.
• For best performance, do not set the initial size to less than the minimum recommended size under Total paging file size for all drives. The recommended size is equivalent to 1.5 times the RAM on your computer. It is good practice to leave the paging file at its recommended size. However, you may increase its size if you frequently use programs that use much memory.
• To delete a paging file, set both the initial size and the maximum size to zero, or click No paging file. We strongly recommend that you do not disable or delete the paging file.

How to manually optimize the memory usage
You can optimize your computer's memory usage. If you use your computer primarily as a workstation instead of as a server, you can devote more memory to your programs. Your programs will work faster and your system cache size will remain the default size that came with Windows XP. You can also set aside more computer memory for a larger system cache if your computer is used primarily as a server, or if you use programs that require a larger cache.

1. Click Start, click Run, and then type sysdm.cpl in the Open box.
2. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Settings under Performance.
3. Click the Advanced tab, and then use one of the following methods under Memory usage:
• Click Programs if you use your computer primarily as a workstation instead of as a server. This option allocates more memory to your programs.
• Click System cache if your computer is used primarily as a server or if you use programs that use a larger cache.

How to manually change the visual effects
Windows provides several options to set the visual effects of your computer. For example, you can show shadows under menus. Shadows give menus a 3-D look. You can configure Windows to display all the contents of a window while you move the window on your screen. To make large text more readable, you can display the smooth edges of screen fonts.Windows provides options to turn on all the settings (for best appearance), or none of the settings (for best computer performance). You can also restore the default settings. To change the visual effects, follow these steps:

1.Click Start, click Run, and then type sysdm.cpl in the Open box.
2. Click the Advanced tab, and then under Performance, click Settings.
3. Click the Visual Effects tab, and then use one of the following methods:
• Click Adjust for best performance to have Windows automatically adjust the settings for best performance.
• Click Adjust for best appearance to have Windows automatically adjust the settings for best appearance.
• Click Custom, and then select the check boxes for those items that you want to turn on. Clear the check boxes for the items that you want to turn off.

Glossary
background program A background program is a program that runs while the user is working on another task. The computer's microprocessor assigns fewer resources to background programs than to foreground programs.environment variable An environment variable is a string of environment information such as a drive, path, or file name that is associated with a symbolic name that Windows can use. You use System in Control Panel or the set command at the command prompt to define environment variables.foreground program A foreground program is a program that runs in the active window (the upper-most window with the highlighted title bar). The foreground program responds to commands that the user issues.mirrored volume A mirrored volume is a fault-tolerant volume that duplicates data on two physical disks. A mirrored volume provides data redundancy by using two identical volumes. These volumes are known as mirrors. They duplicate the information that the volume contains. A mirror is always located on a different disk. If one of the physical disks fails, the data on the failed disk becomes unavailable, but the system continues to operate in the mirror on the remaining disk. You can create mirrored volumes only on dynamic disks.partition A partition is part of a physical disk that functions as if it were a physically separate disk. After you create a partition, you must format it and assign it a drive letter before you can store data on it. On basic disks, partitions are known as basic volumes. Basic volumes include primary partitions and logical drives. On dynamic disks, partitions are known as dynamic volumes. Dynamic volumes include simple, striped, spanned, mirrored, and RAID-5 volumes. RAID-5 volume A RAID-5 volume is a fault-tolerant volume with data and parity striped intermittently across three or more physical disks. Parity is a calculated value that is used to reconstruct data after a failure. If a part of a physical disk fails, Windows recreates the data that was on the failed part from the remaining data and parity. You can create RAID-5 volumes only on dynamic disks, and you cannot mirror or extend RAID-5 volumes.

Keyboard shortcuts that are available in Windows XP

SUMMARY
This article describes the keyboard shortcuts that are available in Windows XP.
General keyboard shortcuts
• CTRL+C (Copy)
• CTRL+X (Cut)
• CTRL+V (Paste)
• CTRL+Z (Undo)
• DELETE (Delete)
• SHIFT+DELETE (Delete the selected item permanently without placing the item in the Recycle Bin)
• CTRL while dragging an item (Copy the selected item)
• CTRL+SHIFT while dragging an item (Create a shortcut to the selected item)
• F2 key (Rename the selected item)
• CTRL+RIGHT ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the next word)
• CTRL+LEFT ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous word)
• CTRL+DOWN ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the next paragraph)
• CTRL+UP ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous paragraph)
• CTRL+SHIFT with any of the arrow keys (Highlight a block of text)
• SHIFT with any of the arrow keys (Select more than one item in a window or on the desktop, or select text in a document)
• CTRL+A (Select all)
• F3 key (Search for a file or a folder)
• ALT+ENTER (View the properties for the selected item)
• ALT+F4 (Close the active item, or quit the active program)
• ALT+ENTER (Display the properties of the selected object)
• ALT+SPACEBAR (Open the shortcut menu for the active window)
• CTRL+F4 (Close the active document in programs that enable you to have multiple documents open simultaneously)
• ALT+TAB (Switch between the open items)
• ALT+ESC (Cycle through items in the order that they had been opened)
• F6 key (Cycle through the screen elements in a window or on the desktop)
• F4 key (Display the Address bar list in My Computer or Windows Explorer)
• SHIFT+F10 (Display the shortcut menu for the selected item)
• ALT+SPACEBAR (Display the System menu for the active window)
• CTRL+ESC (Display the Start menu)
• ALT+Underlined letter in a menu name (Display the corresponding menu)
• Underlined letter in a command name on an open menu (Perform the corresponding c ommand)
• F10 key (Activate the menu bar in the active program)
• RIGHT ARROW (Open the next menu to the right, or open a submenu)
• LEFT ARROW (Open the next menu to the left, or close a submenu)
• F5 key (Update the active window)
• BACKSPACE (View the folder one level up in My Computer or Windows Explorer)
• ESC (Cancel the current task)
• SHIFT when you insert a CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive (Prevent the CD-ROM from automatically playing)
• CTRL+SHIFT+ESC (Open Task Manager)
Dialog box keyboard shortcuts
If you press SHIFT+F8 in extended0................ selection list boxes, you enable extended selection mode. In this mode, you can use an arrow key to move a cursor without changing the selection. You can press CTRL+SPACEBAR or SHIFT+SPACEBAR to adjust the selection. To cancel extended selection mode, press SHIFT+F8 again. Extended selection mode cancels itself when you move the focus to another control.
• CTRL+TAB (Move forward through the tabs)
• CTRL+SHIFT+TAB (Move backward through the tabs)
• TAB (Move forward through the options)
• SHIFT+TAB (Move backward through the options)
• ALT+Underlined letter (Perform the corresponding command or select the corresponding option)
• ENTER (Perform the command for the active option or button)
• SPACEBAR (Select or clear the check box if the active option is a check box)
• Arrow keys (Select a button if the active option is a group of option buttons)
• F1 key (Display Help)
• F4 key (Display the items in the active list)
• BACKSPACE (Open a folder one level up if a folder is selected in the Save As or Open dialog box)
Microsoft natural keyboard shortcuts
• Windows Logo (Display or hide the Start menu)
• Windows Logo+BREAK (Display the System Properties dialog box)
• Windows Logo+D (Display the desktop)
• Windows Logo+M (Minimize all of the windows)
• Windows Logo+SHIFT+M (Restore the minimized windows)
• Windows Logo+E (Open My Computer)
• Windows Logo+F (Search for a file or a folder)
• CTRL+Windows Logo+F (Search for computers)
• Windows Logo+F1 (Display Windows Help)
• Windows Logo+ L (Lock the keyboard)
• Windows Logo+R (Open the Run dialog box)
• Windows Logo+U (Open Utility Manager)
Accessibility keyboard shortcuts
• Right SHIFT for eight seconds (Switch FilterKeys either on or off)
• Left ALT+left SHIFT+PRINT SCREEN (Switch High Contrast either on or off)
• Left ALT+left SHIFT+NUM LOCK (Switch the MouseKeys either on or off)
• SHIFT five times (Switch the StickyKeys either on or off)
• NUM LOCK for five seconds (Switch the ToggleKeys either on or off)
• Windows Logo +U (Open Utility Manager)
Windows Explorer keyboard shortcuts
• END (Display the bottom of the active window)
• HOME (Display the top of the active window)
• NUM LOCK+Asterisk sign (*) (Display all of the subfolders that are under the selected folder)
• NUM LOCK+Plus sign (+) (Display the contents of the selected folder)
• NUM LOCK+Minus sign (-) (Collapse the selected folder)
• LEFT ARROW (Collapse the current selection if it is expanded, or select the parent folder)
• RIGHT ARROW (Display the current selection if it is collapsed, or select the first subfolder)
Shortcut keys for Character Map
After you double-click a character on the grid of characters, you can move through the grid by using the keyboard shortcuts:

•RIGHT ARROW (Move to the right or to the beginning of the next line)
•LEFT ARROW (Move to the left or to the end of the previous line)
•UP ARROW (Move up one row)
•DOWN ARROW (Move down one row)
•PAGE UP (Move up one screen at a time)
•PAGE DOWN (Move down one screen at a time)
•HOME (Move to the beginning of the line)
•END (Move to the end of the line)
•CTRL+HOME (Move to the first character)
•CTRL+END (Move to the last character)
•SPACEBAR (Switch between Enlarged and Normal mode when a character is selected)
Microsoft Management Console (MMC) main window keyboard shortcuts
• CTRL+O (Open a saved console)
• CTRL+N (Open a new console)
• CTRL+S (Save the open console)
• CTRL+M (Add or remove a console item)
• CTRL+W (Open a new window)
• F5 key (Update the content of all console windows)
• ALT+SPACEBAR (Display the MMC window menu)
• ALT+F4 (Close the console)
• ALT+A (Display the Action menu)
• ALT+V (Display the View menu)
• ALT+F (Display the File menu)
• ALT+O (Display the Favorites menu)
MMC console window keyboard shortcuts
• CTRL+P (Print the current page or active pane)
• ALT+Minus sign (-) (Display the window menu for the active console window)
• SHIFT+F10 (Display the Action shortcut menu for the selected item)
• F1 key (Open the Help topic, if any, for the selected item)
• F5 key (Update the content of all console windows)
• CTRL+F10 (Maximize the active console window)
• CTRL+F5 (Restore the active console window)
• ALT+ENTER (Display the Properties dialog box, if any, for the selected item)
• F2 key (Rename the selected item)
• CTRL+F4 (Close the active console window. When a console has only one console window, this shortcut closes the console)

Remote desktop connection navigation
• CTRL+ALT+END (Open the Microsoft Windows NT Security dialog box)
• ALT+PAGE UP (Switch between programs from left to right)
• ALT+PAGE DOWN (Switch between programs from right to left)
• ALT+INSERT (Cycle through the programs in most recently used order)
• ALT+HOME (Display the Start menu)
• CTRL+ALT+BREAK (Switch the client computer between a window and a full screen)
• ALT+DELETE (Display the Windows menu)
• CTRL+ALT+Minus sign (-) (Place a snapshot of the entire client window area on the Terminal server clipboard and provide the same functionality as pressing ALT+PRINT SCREEN on a local computer.)
• CTRL+ALT+Plus sign (+) (Place a snapshot of the active window in the client on the Terminal server clipboard and provide the same functionality as pressing PRINT SCREEN on a local computer.)

Microsoft Internet Explorer navigation

• CTRL+B (Open the Organize Favorites dialog box)
• CTRL+E (Open the Search bar)
• CTRL+F (Start the Find utility)
• CTRL+H (Open the History bar)
• CTRL+I (Open the Favorites bar)
• CTRL+L (Open the Open dialog box)
• CTRL+N (Start another instance of the browser with the same Web address)
• CTRL+O (Open the Open dialog box, the same as CTRL+L)
• CTRL+P (Open the Print dialog box)
• CTRL+R (Update the current Web page)
• CTRL+W (Close the current window)
Other information
• Some keyboard shortcuts may not work if StickyKeys is turned on in Accessibility Options.
• Some of the Terminal Services client shortcuts that are similar to the shortcuts in Remote Desktop Sharing are not available when you use Remote Assistance in Windows XP Home Edition.

Cancel printing or to delete a print job that is stuck in the print queue in Windows XP

Introduction
Printing problems are some of the most frustrating problems that we experience as computer users. This article discusses what to try if you have a problem when you try to cancel a print job, or if you have a problem when you try to delete a print job from the print queue. The four step-by-step methods in this article are intended for beginning to intermediate computer users.If you have to cancel a print job, try Mathod A through D in order.
If you have to delete a print job from the queue, go straight to Method D
Method A: Press the cancel button or use the cancel menu command on the printer
The most obvious way to cancel a print job is to find a cancel button or a cancel menu command on the printer and to press it. So, if you have not already done this, try this method first.If this method worked for you, you are finished with this article. However, you may want to read the "Prevention tips" section to avoid this problem in the future.If your printer does not have these items or if this method did not work for you, try Method B.
Method B: Turn the printer off and on
Next, try turning the printer off and then on. With certain printer models, this cancels the print job.If this method worked for you, you are finished with this article. However, you may want to read the "Prevention tips" section to avoid this problem in the future.If this method did not work for you, turn your printer off, and then try Method C.
Method C: Use Control Panel to cancel printing
This method is a bit fancier. We will use Control Panel to try to cancel printing.But what exactly are you trying to do? Are you trying to cancel printing only a single document, or are there other print jobs that you want to cancel? And are all the print job yours, or are there print jobs that other people have sent to the printer? If you have to cancel documents that other people have sent to the printer, you must have Computer Administrator status or you must have permission to cancel the print jobs. If you are using your own printer, you most likely have Computer Administrator status. If you are printing to a shared printer, you might have to ask the system administrator to cancel the print job for you. To cancel one or more print jobs, follow these steps.
1. Click Start, and then click Run.
2. In the Open box, type control printers, and then click OK.
3. Right-click the icon for your printer, and then click Open.
• To cancel individual print jobs, right-click the print job that you want to cancel, and then click Cancel.
• To cancel all print jobs, click Cancel All Documents on the Printer menu. Note If you cancel a print job that you did want to print, make sure that you send the print job to the printer again.If this method worked for you, you are finished with this article. However, you may want to read the "Prevention tips" section to avoid this problem in the future.If this method did not work for you, make sure that your printer is turned off, and then try Method D.
Method D: Stop the print spooler and delete all spooled files
If you tried Methods A through C and you were not successful, Method D should work for you. If you came to Method D immediately only to delete a print job, some of what we say here might not apply to you, so please bear with us.Method D is somewhat more complex and will require a bit more work than the other methods, but don't worry. Method D looks much more difficult than it really is.First, in case that you don’t know how printing works, here is a short explanation. Print jobs are sent to the printer as spooled files. This means that the files are put in a temporary location so that the printer can access a print queue and print jobs at its own speed. If you stop the spooler and its files, most of the time, you both cancel printing and delete the print job. Note To use this method, you must have Computer Administrator status. If you are using your own printer, you most likely have Computer Administrator status. If you are printing to a shared printer, you might have to ask the system administrator to cancel the print job for you.

Step 1: Start Notepad
To stop the print spooler and its files, we will have you create and run a script file that will automatically stop the service. This sounds difficult, but it really isn't. Just follow these steps carefully.
a. Click Start, and then click Run.
b. In the Open box, type notepad, and then click OK. Notice that a blank Notepad document opens.
Step 2: Copy a command script to Notepad
Now we will have you copy and paste some commands to the Notepad document.
a. Carefully select (highlight) all the following text:
net stop spoolerdel %systemroot%\system32\spool\printers\*.shddel %systemroot%\system32\spool\printers\*.splnet start spooler
b. Right-click the text that you selected, and then click Copy.
c. In Notepad, right-click in the blank document, and then click Paste.
d. Carefully select (highlight) all the following text:
C:\DeletePrintJobs.cmd
e. Right-click the text that you selected, and then click Copy.
f. In Notepad, click Save As on the File menu.
g. In the File Name box, right-click, and then click Paste.Note Notice that this file name differs from most other file names that you might have seen. That is because this file is a command script file.
h. Click Save.
Step 3: Run the command script file
Now that you have created the command script file, you will run it. To run it, you will copy and paste the name of the command script file in the Run box.
a. Carefully select (highlight) all the following text:
C:\DeletePrintJobs.cmd
b. Right-click the text that you selected, and then click Copy.
c. Click Start, and then click Run.
d. In the Open box, right-click, and then click Paste.
e. Click OK.
f. Notice that the Command Prompt window opens to run the command script file that you created. Notice also that this window closes automatically when the command script file has finished running. If you do not see the Command Prompt window open, check that you saved the command script file by using the correct name and that you entered the correct command script file name in the Run box. Note If this method does not work the first time, or if you cannot print anything after you use this method, restart your computer, and then try again.If this method worked, you are finished with this article. However, you may want to read the "Prevention tips" section to prevent this problem from happening again. If this method does not work, we're sorry that this article was unable to help you. For your next steps, you might want to ask someone for help or contact support.

Change the listening port for Remote Desktop

Warning :- If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
1. Start Registry Editor.
2. Locate and then click the following registry subkey:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\TerminalServer\WinStations\RDP-Tcp\PortNumber
3. On the Edit menu, click Modify, and then click Decimal.
4. Type the new port number, and then click OK.
5. Quit Registry Editor.

Turn on automatic logon in Windows XP


INTRODUCTION
This article describes how to configure Microsoft Windows XP to automate the logon process by storing your password and other pertinent information in the registry database. This feature permits other users to start your computer and to use the account that you establish to automatically log on.Important If you turn on autologon, using Windows XP becomes more convenient. However, using this feature can pose a security risk.


MORE INFORMATION
Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.If you set a computer for automatic logon, anyone who can physically gain access to the computer can also gain access to everything that is on the computer, including any network or networks that the computer is connected to. Additionally, if you turn on automatic logon, the password is stored in the registry in plain text. The specific registry key that stores this value is remotely readable by the Authenticated Users group. Therefore, only use this setting if the computer is physically secured and if you make sure that users who you do not trust cannot remotely see the registry.You can use Registry Editor to add your log on information. To do this,


follow these steps:
1. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.
2. Locate the following registry key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsNT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon
3. Using your account name and password, double-click the DefaultUserName entry, type your user name, and then click OK.
4. Double-click the DefaultPassword entry, type your password under the value data box, and then click OK.If there is no DefaultPassword value, create the value. To do this, follow these steps:
a. In Registry Editor, click Edit, click New, and then click String Value.
b. Type DefaultPassword as the value name, and then press ENTER.
c. Double-click the newly created key, and then type your password in the Value Data box.If no DefaultPassword string is specified, Windows XP automatically changes the value of the AutoAdminLogon registry key from 1 (true) to 0 (false) to turn off the AutoAdminLogon feature.
5. Double-click the AutoAdminLogon entry, type 1 in the Value Data box, and then click OK.If there is no AutoAdminLogon entry, create the entry. To do this, follow these steps:
a. In Registry Editor, click Edit, click New, and then click String Value.
b. Type AutoAdminLogon as the value name, and then press ENTER.
c. Double-click the newly created key, and then type 1 in the Value Data box.
6. Quit Registry Editor.
7. Click Start, click Restart, and then click OK.After your computer restarts and Windows XP starts, you can log on automatically. If you want to bypass the automatic logon to log on as a different user, hold down the SHIFT key after you log off or after Windows XP restarts. Note that this procedure applies only to the first logon. To enforce this setting for future logoffs, the administrator must set the following registry key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsNT\CurrentVersion\WinlogonValue:ForceAutoLogonType: REG_SZData:

1 You can also use turn on automatic logon without editing the registry in Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition and in Microsoft Windows XP Professional on a computer that is not joined to a domain. To do this, follow these steps:


1. Click Start, and then click Run.
2. In the Open box, type control userpasswords2, and then click OK.Note When users try to display help information in the User Accounts window in Windows XP Home Edition, the help information is not displayed. Additionally, users receive the following error message:
Cannot find the Drive:\Windows\System32\users.hlp Help file. Check to see that the file exists on your hard disk drive. If it does not exist, you must reinstall it.
3. Clear the "Users must enter a user name and password to use this computer" check box, and then click Apply.
4. In the Automatically Log On window, type the password in the Password box, and then retype the password in the Confirm Password box.
5. Click OK to close the Automatically Log On window, and then click OK to close the User Accounts window

Configure a Wireless Access Point

SUMMARY
If you already have an Ethernet base station or router on your network that provides security, and you want to add wireless capabilities to your existing network, you can configure a Microsoft wireless base station to function as an access point. This article provides a brief overview of wireless access points, and instructions to configure your wireless base station.
Overview of Access Points
With a wireless access point, computers that have wireless network adapters can connect to each other and to computers on the wired (Ethernet) section of the network. Wireless base stations and routers include a built-in access point to provide wireless functionality. When a wireless base station is set up to function only as an access point, it functions as a bridge, creating connections between two separate segments of your network. In this case, the access point creates connections between the 802.11b wireless network segment and the Ethernet network segments. This is similar to how a hub or switch works. However, a wireless access point works with wireless connections instead of Ethernet connections. You can configure newer wireless routers, such as the Microsoft MN-500 Wireless Base Station, either as a router or a bridge. A base station configured as a router protects your network with a firewall and Network Address Translation (NAT) features. A base station configured as a router also controls how computers on your wireless and Ethernet networks connect to each other and the Internet. When a wireless base station is configured in bridge mode, the base station becomes a simple access point. With this access point, wireless computers can communicate directly with the Ethernet network. All security features are disabled and the base station cannot control how your computers use the network. The wireless base station also stops assigning IP addresses through DHCP, so either you must have an existing DHCP server, or you must assign static IP addresses to all devices on your network.
Important: While the base station is in bridging mode, you cannot access the Base Station Management Tool to modify your settings. To return your base station to the default router mode of operation, or to change your access point settings, reset the base station to its factory default settings.
Add an Access Point to Your Network
There are many possible network configurations for access points. Most common network setups belong to one of the following two scenarios:
Add Wireless Functionality to an Existing Network You have a working Ethernet network and you just want to allow access to the network from computers that use 802.11b-compatible wireless network adapters.
Configure Wireless-Only Access to a Broadband Modem You have a broadband modem that includes built-in security features such as a firewall or NAT. You want to use 802.11b-compatible wireless network adapters on all computers that connect to the Internet through your modem. The configuration options for these two scenarios are very similar. When you add an access point to an existing Ethernet network, you connect your wireless base station to an existing router or gateway on your network. If you are not using any Ethernet computers on your network, you can connect the wireless base station in bridge mode directly to the broadband modem.
The configuration options for these two scenarios are very similar. When you add an access point to an existing Ethernet network, you connect your wireless base station to an existing router or gateway on your network. If you are not using any Ethernet computers on your network, you can connect the wireless base station in bridge mode directly to the broadband modem.
Security Considerations
Make sure that you have a firewall to protect your computers from unwanted intruders on the Internet. Make sure that you have a network device between your computers and the Internet to provide network security. In bridge mode, the base station does not provide this type of protection.With the access point, you can use Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) to protect your wireless signals from eavesdroppers. However, WEP does nothing to protect your computers from hackers and viruses that enter through your Internet connection.
Configure the Base Station as an Access Point
loadTOCNode(2, 'summary');
The following steps show the first-time setup of a Microsoft Wireless Base Station as a wireless access point. With these steps, you connect the Wireless Base Station to a computer for configuration, and then connect the Wireless Base Station to the base station, router, or gateway. The base station, router, or gateway is connected to your broadband modem.To configure the
Wireless Base Station as a wireless access point, follow these steps:
1. Connect the Wireless Base Station to a computer for configuration. Because it is more secure, set up the base station through a wired connection first, and then switch to a wireless connection. For information about how to do this, see the User's Guide for the Wireless Base Station.
2. Start the Base Station Management Tool. In the logon box, type your password. The default password is admin.
3. Click Wireless, and then click to select the Enable wireless access check box.
4. If you want to change the wireless channel, click a number in the Wireless channel number list box.
5. If you want to change the network name, type a new network name in the Wireless network name (SSID) box. The network name is case sensitive and cannot be greater than 32 characters.
6. To save your changes, click Apply.
7. In the Base Station Management Tool, click Security in the right pane. The Security menu appears in the center pane.
8. If you want to use WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) security on this access point, follow these steps:
a. On the Security menu, click Wireless Security.
b. Click Enable wireless security.
c. In the Encryption strength list box, click either 128-bit or 64-bit.
d. In the first (upper left) Key box, type an encryption key. Encryption keys contain
hexadecimal digits that are numbers 0 through 9 or letters in the range A through F.
e. If you selected 64-bit encryption, set the key index to 1 in the Key index list box. The key
index number indicates which of up to four WEP keys are enabled on the network.
f. To enable the wireless security, click Apply.
9. If you want to limit wireless access so that only certain computers can connect, configure MAC filtering now. As soon as you turn on bridging, you cannot access the Base Station Management Tool, the interface that you use to configure the Wireless Base Station. For information about how to configure MAC filtering, see the User's Guide for the Wireless Base Station.
10. On the Security menu, click Network Mode.
11. Click to select the Bridging Mode check box.
12. To save your changes, click Apply. When you are prompted to confirm the switch to bridging mode, click OK to continue. The base station resets itself, and then the base station enters bridging mode. The Base Station Management Tool stops functioning.
13. Then the power LED light on the base station turns solid green to indicate that the reset is complete, turn off the computer and the base station.
14. Turn on the base station, and then turn on the computer.
15. Move the wireless base station to the location where you want it. Use an Ethernet cable to connect to the base station, router, or gateway that is connected to your broadband modem. Because the wireless base station is now functioning as a wireless access point, it does not have to be connected directly to a computer with an Ethernet cable.

Create a New User Profile in Windows XP Professional

1. Log on as the Administrator or as a user with administrator credentials.
2. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
3. Click User Accounts.
4. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Advanced.
5. In the left pane, click the Users folder.
6. On the Action menu, click New User.
7. Enter the appropriate user information, and then click Create.
Create a New User Profile in Windows XP Home Edition
1. Log on as the Administrator or as a user with administrator credentials.
2. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
3. Click User Accounts.
4. Under Pick a task, click Create a new account.
5. Type a name for the user information, and then click Next.
6. Click an account type, and then click Create Account.
Copy Files to the New User Profile
1. Log on as a user other than the user whose profile you are copying files to or from.
2. In Windows Explorer, click Tools, click Folder Options, click the View tab, click Show hidden files and folders, click to clear the Hide protected operating system files check box, and then click OK.
3. Locate the C:\Documents and Settings\Old_Username folder, where C is the drive on which Windows XP is installed, and Old_Username is the name of the profile you want to copy user data from.
4. Press and hold down the CTRL key while you click each file and subfolder in this folder, except the following files:
• Ntuser.dat
• Ntuser.dat.log
• Ntuser.ini
5. On the Edit menu, click Copy.
6. Locate the C:\Documents and Settings\New_Username folder, where C is the drive on which Windows XP is installed, and New_Username is the name of the user profile that you created in the "Create a New User Profile" section.
7. On the Edit menu, click Paste.
8. Log off the computer, and then log on as the new user.Note You must import your e-mail messages and addresses to the new user profile before you delete the old profile.

Use the Net Use command to map or disconnect a drive

You can use the net use command for batch files and scripts. To use the net use command to map or disconnect a drive:
•To map a network drive:
1. Click Start, and then click Run.
2. In the Open box, type cmd.
3. Type net use x: \\computer name\share name, where x: is the drive letter you want to assign to the shared resource.
• To disconnect a mapped drive:
1. Click Start, and then click Run.
2. In the Open box, type cmd.
3. Type net use x: /delete, where x: is the drive letter of the shared resource.

Connect a drive from My Network Places


1.Click Start, click My Network Places, click Entire Network, and then double-click Microsoft Windows Network.


2.Double-click the domain that you want to open.

3.Double-click the computer that has the shared resource you want to map. All the shared resources for that computer automatically appear in the window.

4.Right-click the shared drive or folder that you want to map, and then click Map Network Drive.

5.Click the drive letter that you want to use, and then specify whether you want to reconnect every time that you log on to your computer. Note Network drives are mapped by using letters starting from the letter Z. This is the default drive letter for the first mapped drive you create. However, you can select another letter if you want to use a letter other than Z.


6.Click Finish.

Your Ad Here

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...