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Showing posts from February, 2008

You cannot install some programs after you restore Windows Vista by using a "Windows Complete PC Backup and Restore Image"

SYMPTOMS After you restore a Windows Vista-based computer by using a "Windows Complete PC Backup and Restore Image," you may be unable to install certain programs. When this problem occurs, you may receive the following error message: The Directory Name is Invalid.


CAUSE This problem occurs because the Temp folder (%temp%) is not restored after you restore the backup. Typically, the Temp folder is found in the following location:C:\Windows\Temp



RESOLUTIONTo resolve this problem after the problem has occurred To resolve this problem after the problem has occurred, you must re-create the Temp folder. Also, you must make sure that the Temp folder has the correct permissions. To do this, follow these steps: 1.Click Start, click All Programs, and then click Accessories.2.Right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as Administrator.

If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type your password or click Continue. 3.Type the following command at the comman…

You cannot start Windows XP after you install Windows Vista in a dual-boot configuration together with Windows XP

SYMPTOMSAfter you install Windows Vista in a dual-boot configuration together with Microsoft Windows XP, you receive an error message that resembles the following when you try to start the computer by using Windows XP: Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt:

C:\Windows\system32\ntoskrnl.exe. Please re-install a copy of the above file.


CAUSEYou experience this problem if Windows Vista is installed in formerly unallocated disk space that existed in front of the partition on which Windows XP is installed.

In this situation, the Windows Vista Setup program creates a new partition in the unallocated disk space. Because a new partition is created in front of the partition on which Windows XP is installed, the Boot.ini entry for the Windows XP installation points to an invalid partition.

Consider the following scenario: •You have a hard disk, or disk 0, that has some unallocated hard disk space in front of the Windows XP partition.•The Windows XP Boot.ini file po…

The hybrid sleep feature and the hibernation feature in Windows Vista may become unavailable after you use the Disk Cleanup Tool

SYMPTOMSAfter you use the Disk Cleanup Tool in Windows Vista, you may experience the following symptoms:•You cannot see the Hibernate option in Power Options.•When you use the sleep feature, the computer does not recover its settings if power is lost.
CAUSEThis problem occurs when the Disk Cleanup Tool disables the hibernation file. The hibernation file must be enabled to access the hybrid sleep feature and the hibernation feature in Windows Vista.

When the hibernation file is disabled, and the hybrid sleep feature is enabled, a backup of open programs and open files will not be saved to the disk when you use the sleep feature in Windows Vista. Additionally, if the computer loses power while the Windows is in sleep mode, open programs and open files will not be recovered, and any unsaved work will be lost.


RESOLUTIONTo resolve this problem in Windows Vista, run the powercfg -h on command at a command prompt to enable the hibernate feature and the hybrid sleep feature. To run this comman…

Cumulative time zone update for Microsoft Windows operating systems

Important This update supersedes and replaces update KB931836, released in January 2007. This update also includes additional time zone changes that were signed in to law after update KB931836 was created. Customers who have already deployed update KB931836 should evaluate whether any of the five specific time zone changes that are addressed in the update described by this Microsoft Knowledge Base (KB) article merit deploying this update immediately. If systems are not directly affected, you can schedule deployment at the next available opportunity. We recommend that all customers standardize on the most current Windows cumulative time zone update to guarantee the consistency of the time zone database on all systems.


INTRODUCTIONThe update that this article describes changes the time zone data to account for daylight saving time (DST) changes in several countries, as outlined. This update also includes other DST-related changes, time zone-related changes, and settings-related changes. …

Update is available that improves the compatibility and reliability of Windows Vista

INTRODUCTION
This update resolves some compatibility issues and reliability issues in Windows Vista. By applying this update, you can achieve better reliability and hardware compatibility in various scenarios.



The computer stops responding, and you receive a "Display driver stopped responding and has recovered" error message. You can restart the computer only by pressing the computer's power button.•The computer stops responding or restarts unexpectedly when you play video games or perform desktop operations.•The Diagnostic Policy Service (DPS) stops responding when the computer is under heavy load or when very little memory is available. This problem prevents diagnostics from working.•The screen goes blank after an external display device that is connected to the computer is turned off. For example, this problem may occur when a projector is turned off during a presentation.•There are stability issues with some graphics processing units (GPUs). These issues could cause GP…

Maximum Partition Size Using FAT16 File System

SUMMARY
Microsoft MS-DOS versions 4.0 and later allow FDISK to partition hard disks up to 4 gigabytes (GB) in size. However, the MS-DOS file allocation table (FAT) file system can support only 2 GB per partition. Because of this fact, a hard disk between 2 and 4 GB in size must be broken down into multiple partitions, each of which does not exceed 2 GB. NOTE: Windows 95 OEM Service Release version 2 and later support drives larger than 2 GB using the FAT32 file system. For more information about the FAT32 file system



MORE INFORMATION

The 2-GB partition limit is imposed by the maximum number of clusters and the largest cluster size supported by the FAT file system. The FAT file system is limited to 65,525 clusters. The size of a cluster must be a power of 2 and less than 65,536 bytes--this results in a maximum cluster size of 32,768 bytes (32K). Multiplying the maximum number of clusters (65,525) by the maximum cluster size (32,768) equals 2 GB. Note that the hard disk drive must be suppo…

Triple Boot to Windows NT, Windows 95/98, and MS-DOS

SUMMARY
This article describes how to set up a computer so that the user can go directly to Windows NT, Windows 95/98, or MS-DOS by making a selection from the Boot.ini, without any need for Windows 95/98 multiple boot support.
MORE INFORMATION

Windows 98 or Windows 95 should not be installed in the same partition as Windows NT; the shared Program Files folder can cause problems with interactions between Microsoft Internet Explorer and Microsoft Outlook Express on these operating systems. Also, if you are using both FAT32 and NTFS volumes, the NTFS partition should be on a logical drive letter that preceeds the FAT32 partition drive letter. If this is set up the other way around, Windows NT will not find the boot partition (where the system files are located). This information applies to x86 processors only. Follow these steps to enable triple boot support:
1.Install MS-DOS.
2.Install Windows NT.
3. Remove the read-only, hidden, and system attributes of Bootsect.dos by typing and running …

Multiple boot Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Me, and MS-DOS

SUMMARY
This article describes how to configure an Intel-based computer to multiple boot the following Microsoft operating system:
•MS-DOS
•Microsoft Windows 95, Microsoft Windows 98, or Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me)
•Microsoft Windows NT
•Microsoft Windows 2000
•Microsoft Windows XP

MORE INFORMATION
If you want to multiple boot operating systems, install the operating systems in the following order:
1.MS-DOS
2.Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me
3.Windows NT
4.Windows 2000
5.Windows XPInstall each operating system according to the standard installation procedure. You can start the following operating systems from the boot loader (Osloader) screen:
•Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me
•Windows NT
•Windows 2000
•Windows XPNOTE: You should install each operating system on a separate logical drive. If you install multiple operating systems on single drive, you may experience problems when you attempt to run those operating systems. If you install multiple operating systems on a single d…

Change drive letter assignments in Windows XP

SUMMARY
This article describes how to assign, to change, or to remove drive letters on a drive, a partition, or a volume by using the Disk Management snap-in in Microsoft Windows XP. The Disk Management snap-in is an administrative tool for managing hard disks and the volumes or partitions that they contain. Use the Disk Management snap-in when you want to add, to change, or to remove drive letters on drives, on partitions, or on volumes on your computer's hard disks, CD-ROM drives, and other removable media devices. Your computer can use up to 26 drive letters, from A through Z. Use drive letters C through Z for hard disk drives. Drive letters A and B are reserved for floppy disk drives. However, if your computer does not have a floppy disk drive, you can assign these letters to removable drives. Before you modify drive-letter assignments, note the following items:
• Changing the drive letter of the system volume or the boot volume is not a built-in feature of the Disk Management …

Manually Remove Programs from the Add or Remove Programs Tool

SUMMARY
This article explains how to manually remove an item from the Currently installed programs list in the Add or Remove Programs tool if the item is still displayed after you initially try to remove it. MORE INFORMATION
The Currently installed programs list in the Add or Remove Programs tool lists all of the Windows-compatible programs that have an uninstall program or feature. Occasionally, a program may not be removed completely, and the registry key that is used to display the program in the Currently installed programs list remains. In this situation, you may need to manually remove the program from the Currently installed programs list in Add or Remove Programs. To do this, follow these steps. WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
1. Clic…

Disk Cleanup Tool in Windows XP

SUMMARY
This article describes how to use the Disk Cleanup tool in Windows XP.

MORE INFORMATION
The Disk Cleanup tool helps you free up space on your hard disk by searching your disk for files that you can safely delete. You can choose to delete some or all of the files. Use Disk Cleanup to perform any of the following tasks to free up space on your hard disk:
• Remove temporary Internet files.
• Remove downloaded program files. For example, ActiveX controls and Java applets that are downloaded from the Internet.
• Empty the Recycle Bin.
• Remove Windows temporary files.
• Remove optional Windows components that you are not using.
• Remove installed programs that you no longer use.You can start Disk Cleanup, by doing any of the following:
• Click Start, and then click Run. In the Open box, type cleanmgr, and then click OK. -or-
• Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Disk Cleanup. -or-
• In Windows Explorer or My Computer, right-click the…

Set performance options in Windows XP

INTRODUCTION
Windows allocates resources according to its settings and manages devices accordingly. You can use the System tool in Control Panel to change performance options that control how programs use memory, including paging file size, or environment variables that tell your computer where to find some types of information. This article describes how to set the performance options for your computer. Manual steps to set performance options in Windows XP
How to manually manage processor time

Windows manages system processing. Windows can allocate tasks between processors and manage multiple processes on a single processor. However, you can set Windows to allocate more processor time to the program that you are currently running. The added processor time causes programs to respond more quickly. Or, if you have background programs such as printing or disk backup that you want to run while you work, you can have Windows share processor resources equally between background and foreground …

Keyboard shortcuts that are available in Windows XP

SUMMARY
This article describes the keyboard shortcuts that are available in Windows XP. General keyboard shortcuts
• CTRL+C (Copy)
• CTRL+X (Cut)
• CTRL+V (Paste)
• CTRL+Z (Undo)
• DELETE (Delete)
• SHIFT+DELETE (Delete the selected item permanently without placing the item in the Recycle Bin)
• CTRL while dragging an item (Copy the selected item)
• CTRL+SHIFT while dragging an item (Create a shortcut to the selected item)
• F2 key (Rename the selected item)
• CTRL+RIGHT ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the next word)
• CTRL+LEFT ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous word)
• CTRL+DOWN ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the next paragraph)
• CTRL+UP ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous paragraph)
• CTRL+SHIFT with any of the arrow keys (Highlight a block of text)
• SHIFT with any of the arrow keys (Select more than one item in a window or on the desktop, or select text in a document)
• CTRL+A (Select all)
• F3 key…

Cancel printing or to delete a print job that is stuck in the print queue in Windows XP

Introduction
Printing problems are some of the most frustrating problems that we experience as computer users. This article discusses what to try if you have a problem when you try to cancel a print job, or if you have a problem when you try to delete a print job from the print queue. The four step-by-step methods in this article are intended for beginning to intermediate computer users.If you have to cancel a print job, try Mathod A through D in order. If you have to delete a print job from the queue, go straight to Method D Method A: Press the cancel button or use the cancel menu command on the printer
The most obvious way to cancel a print job is to find a cancel button or a cancel menu command on the printer and to press it. So, if you have not already done this, try this method first.If this method worked for you, you are finished with this article. However, you may want to read the "Prevention tips" section to avoid this problem in the future.If your printer does not have …

Change the listening port for Remote Desktop

Warning :- If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
1. Start Registry Editor.
2. Locate and then click the following registry subkey:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\TerminalServer\WinStations\RDP-Tcp\PortNumber
3. On the Edit menu, click Modify, and then click Decimal.
4. Type the new port number, and then click OK.
5. Quit Registry Editor.

Turn on automatic logon in Windows XP

INTRODUCTION
This article describes how to configure Microsoft Windows XP to automate the logon process by storing your password and other pertinent information in the registry database. This feature permits other users to start your computer and to use the account that you establish to automatically log on.Important If you turn on autologon, using Windows XP becomes more convenient. However, using this feature can pose a security risk.

MORE INFORMATION
Warning If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.If you set a computer for automatic logon, anyone who can physically gain access to the computer can also gain access to everything that is on the computer, including any network or networks that the computer is connected to. Additionally, if you turn on automatic…

Configure a Wireless Access Point

SUMMARY
If you already have an Ethernet base station or router on your network that provides security, and you want to add wireless capabilities to your existing network, you can configure a Microsoft wireless base station to function as an access point. This article provides a brief overview of wireless access points, and instructions to configure your wireless base station. Overview of Access Points
With a wireless access point, computers that have wireless network adapters can connect to each other and to computers on the wired (Ethernet) section of the network. Wireless base stations and routers include a built-in access point to provide wireless functionality. When a wireless base station is set up to function only as an access point, it functions as a bridge, creating connections between two separate segments of your network. In this case, the access point creates connections between the 802.11b wireless network segment and the Ethernet network segments. This is similar to how a h…

Create a New User Profile in Windows XP Professional

1. Log on as the Administrator or as a user with administrator credentials.
2. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
3. Click User Accounts.
4. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Advanced.
5. In the left pane, click the Users folder.
6. On the Action menu, click New User.
7. Enter the appropriate user information, and then click Create.
Create a New User Profile in Windows XP Home Edition
1. Log on as the Administrator or as a user with administrator credentials.
2. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
3. Click User Accounts.
4. Under Pick a task, click Create a new account.
5. Type a name for the user information, and then click Next.
6. Click an account type, and then click Create Account.
Copy Files to the New User Profile
1. Log on as a user other than the user whose profile you are copying files to or from.
2. In Windows Explorer, click Tools, click Folder Options, click the View tab, click Show hidden files and folders, click to clear the Hide protected operating system files che…

Use the Net Use command to map or disconnect a drive

You can use the net use command for batch files and scripts. To use the net use command to map or disconnect a drive:
•To map a network drive:
1. Click Start, and then click Run.
2. In the Open box, type cmd.
3. Type net use x: \\computer name\share name, where x: is the drive letter you want to assign to the shared resource.
• To disconnect a mapped drive:
1. Click Start, and then click Run.
2. In the Open box, type cmd.
3. Type net use x: /delete, where x: is the drive letter of the shared resource.

Connect a drive from My Network Places

1.Click Start, click My Network Places, click Entire Network, and then double-click Microsoft Windows Network.
2.Double-click the domain that you want to open.
3.Double-click the computer that has the shared resource you want to map. All the shared resources for that computer automatically appear in the window.
4.Right-click the shared drive or folder that you want to map, and then click Map Network Drive.
5.Click the drive letter that you want to use, and then specify whether you want to reconnect every time that you log on to your computer. Note Network drives are mapped by using letters starting from the letter Z. This is the default drive letter for the first mapped drive you create. However, you can select another letter if you want to use a letter other than Z.
6.Click Finish.